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Operation Pollination

Life Circles

H2O

Beyond Recycling

Natural Engineering

 


Operation Pollination

Science in the Garden

Apply scientific thinking to explore the intriguing world of plant and animal life in this interactive program highlighting living organisms, life cycles and systems.

Discover the connection of living systems and investigate why and how flowering plants have developed with their pollinator partners. Gain an appreciation of this delicate relationship by identifying adaptations of plants and pollinators.

K-2: Students learn about different types of pollinators as they hunt for them in the Garden. They learn about the parts of a flower used in pollination as they create a pollinator and try to pollinate a flower.

3-5: Students will identify parts of a flower used in pollination. Students discover the process of pollination while observing and recording various pollinators at work. Students will have an opportunity to compete in a pollination game.

6-8: Students will dissect flowers to identify flower parts used in pollination. Activities will enable students to discover how human impact plays a role in the pollinators’ survival and how our relationship is mutually beneficial.

Pre- and Post-Activities for Operation Pollination

Next Generation Science Standards

Standard: K-8-LS1. From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

  • K-LS1-1 Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.
  • 1-LS1-1 Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.
  • 3-LS1-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.
  • 4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
  • 5-LS1-1 Support and argument that plants get the materials they need for growth chiefly from air and water.
  • MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.

Standard: K-8-LS2. Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

  • 2-LS2-2 Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.
  • 3-LS2-1 Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

Standard: K-8-LS3. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits

  • 1-LS3-1 Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

Standard: K-8-LS4. Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

  • 2-LS4-1 Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

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Life Circles

Life Science in the Garden

Trace the life cycles of plants, trees and insects in this hands-on program connecting the cycles of nature with life science in the garden. Students are challenged to sequence the stages of insect and plant cycles as well as identify the interdependence of plants and animals in a garden setting.

K-2: Students explore the life cycles of plants, trees and insects through books, models, and specimens.

3-5: Students search for living and non-living factors in an ecosystem and then observe plants and insects in different life stages.

6-8: Students find biotic and abiotic factors in an ecosystem and then make scientific observations of plants and insects and identify life stages.

Pre- and Post-Activities for Life Circles

Next Generation Science Standards

Standard: K-8-LS1. From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

  • K-LS1-1 Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.
  • 1-LS1-1 Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.
  • 3-LS1-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.
  • 4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
  • 5-LS1-1 Support and argument that plants get the materials they need for growth chiefly from air and water.
  • MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.

Standard: K-8-LS2. Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

  • 2-LS2-2 Develop a simple model that mimics the function of an animal in dispersing seeds or pollinating plants.
  • 3-LS2-1 Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.
  • Standard: K-8-LS3. Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
  • 1-LS3-1 Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

Standard: K-8-LS4. Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

  • 2-LS4-1 Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.

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H2O

Earth Science in the Garden

Dive into the study of water and the water cycle in this in-depth earth science program. Get acquainted to the clever ways in which plants and people use water and record observations and conduct water-based experiments.

K-2: Students learn that water is essential to all life and is a valuable and limited resource. They explore different ways that plants collect and use water.

3-5: Students explore the water cycle and learn about water conservation and water pollution. They conduct a water experiment to find out if plants and soil can filter out water pollutants and create a pamphlet showing what they learned.

6-8: Students investigate watersheds and how to protect them through several water experiments. They create a brochure that can be used to teach others how to protect water.

Pre- and Post-Activities for H2O

Next Generation Science Standards

Standard: K-8-ESS2. Earth’s Systems

  • 2-ESS2-3 Obtain information to identify where water is found on Earth and that it can be solid or liquid.
  • 4-ESS2-2 Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth’s features.
  • 5-ESS2-2 Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.
  • MS-ESS2-4 Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

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Beyond Recycling

Sustainability in the Garden—Natural Resources

Learn the difference between renewable and non-renewable energy, with focus on solar energy. Participate in hands-on STEM activities throughout our Gardens and explore how to conserve at home, in school, and in the community.

K-2: Students are engaged with hands-on activities to discover the value of Earth's natural resources. They discover how Longwood is committed to sustainable practices and how they can make a difference at home by reducing, reusing, and recycling.

3-5: Students will explore both renewable and non-renewable resources, experiment with solar detectors, and discover the connection between photosynthesis and solar energy. They will uncover sustainable practices being used throughout Longwood's property and leave with a plan of action to become a better global citizen.

6-8: Students uncover Longwood's sustainable practices, including: solar energy, recycling, composting, and the reuse of water for irrigation. They will experiment with solar cells to recognize solar energy as a renewable resource and discover how everyday behaviors impact the Earth.

Pre- and Post-Activities for Beyond Recycling—Natural Resources

Next Generation Science Standards

Standard: K-8-PS3. Energy

  • K-PS3-1 Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth’s surface.
  • 4-PS3-2 Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electrical currents.

Standard: K-8-ESS3. Earth and Human Activity

  • K-ESS3-3 Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment.
  • 4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and that their uses affect the environment.
  • 4-ESS3-2 Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans.
  • 5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.
  • MS-ESS3-3 Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.

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Natural Engineering

Design in the Garden

Explore nature's genius and discover unique ways of improving manmade materials and processes. Engineer an original design by imitating a structure and/or function that exists in the natural world. Be inspired to communicate innovations through imaginative drawings, vocabulary, and writing.

K-2: Students learn how to look differently while discovering the patterns and shapes of plants in our 1,077-acre display garden. Students are inspired to sketch, describe, and design a model to solve a problem. 

3-5: Students examine the unique characteristics of plants to problem-solve. Students will mimic patterns and shapes found in nature to create, experiment, and compare design solutions. 

6-8: Students problem solve using the 4.5-acre Conservatory as inspiration. Faced with a common community problem, students must search for and apply characteristics of plants to design a new playground. Students will sketch a diagram and write precise descriptions about their design.

Pre- and Post-Activities for Natural Engineering

Next Generation Science Standards

Life Science: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

  • K-LS1-1 Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals need to survive.
  • 1-LS1-1 Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.
  • 4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. 

Engineering Design

  • K-2-ETS1-1 Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.
  • K-2-ETS1-2 Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.
  • 3-5-ETS1-1 Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.
  • 3-5-ETS1-1 Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
  • MS-ETS1-1 Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.
  • MS-ETS1-2 Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem. 

K-8 programs are designed to include activities that integrate Common Core State Standards in Language Arts.

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Grants & Registration

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Register for onsite, Longwood-led, curriculum-based programs.

K-8 Curriculum Programs

Mathematics

Uncover the mysteries of mathematics that lie hidden in our Gardens with experiential learning that highlights geometry and measurement.

Science and Technology

Choose from Operation Pollination, Life Circles, H2O, Beyond Recycling, and Natural Engineering.

Social Studies

Explore topography by using maps and other geographic tools that assist with the navigation and interpretation of our section of the Earth’s surface.

Arts and Humanities

Students will embark on an artistic garden voyage that explores the enticing world of garden-inspired art.