What’s in Bloom

Tall, green stems with medium sized yellow flowers

Featured Bloom

Cup-plant

Silphium perfoliatum

The Meadow Garden is filled with plants that benefit wildlife.  Cup-plant is a native perennial that grows to 8 feet tall.  Its perfoliate leaves, which clasp around the stem forming a cup, collect water for birds and insects.  Cup-plant provides nectar and pollen for a variety of bees, while birds, especially goldfinches, eat its seeds. 

See what’s in bloom and enjoy the beauty of our Gardens.

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  • White petaled flower with orange center and green leaves.

    Franklinia

    Franklinia alatamaha

    Franklinia, or the Franklin tree is a small deciduous tree in the camellia family. It was first discovered by the Philadelphia based botanists John and William Bartram on the banks of the Alatamaha River in Georgia in 1765. William Bartram collected seed in 1773, and successfully cultivated the plant at the Bartram gardens in Philadelphia. Bartram named the new plant Franklinia alatamaha in honor of his father’s friend Benjamin Franklin.  It is a unique tree as it is the only species in its genus, and it is now extinct in the wild. The original stand of trees was restricted to a small area and the species went extinct soon after its discovery, with the last confirmed sighting recorded in 1803. The probable causes for its demise were increased activity associated with settlers; for example fires and land clearance. All known living specimens in cultivation today are descended from the seed collected by William Bartram.  Interestingly, while the tree was discovered in Georgia, it performs well in more northern climates. It has therefore been hypothesized that the tree was pushed south during the last ice age, then stranded when the ice retreated. The trees that the Bartrams discovered might have been the last remnants of a once much larger population.  The Franklin tree is available commercially and is prized in cultivation for both its story and its fragrant camellia-like flowers and red fall foliage.

  • Cone shaped spear of white flower clusters

    Panicle Hydrangea

    Hydrangea paniculata ′Unique′

    Blooming from mid summer to early fall, panicle hydrangea gets its name from its large, showy panicles of white flowers.  Leaving the dried flowerheads on the plant can add interesting forms and textures to the garden in winter.  Combined with its long bloom time, panicle hydrangea offers nearly year-round interest.  

  • Sweet Pepperbush

    Clethra alnifolia ′Hummingbird′

    ‘Hummingbird’ is a dwarf selection of the deciduous shrub Clethra alnifolia that displays full-size flowers on a compact three foot plant. The flowers release a wonderful scent when the upright panicles bloom from July to August. Sweet pepperbush prefers moist soil in dappled sun but will tolerate a little less light or even full sun and is hardy from USDA zones 4 to 9.  This American native is deer resistant and is a vigorous spreader.  It also attracts butterflies.

  • Tall spike of tinny purple, pink, and white flowers that darken on the way down

    Pineapple-lily

    Eucomis ′Oakhurst′

    Eucomis is a bulb with a flower reminiscent of a pineapple, hence its common name, pineapple-lily.  Native to southern Africa, pineapple-lily blooms in summer for several weeks.  This selection, ‘Oakhurst’, features dark foliage and stems.  Pineapple-lily grows in full sun and well-drained soil and is hardy to USDA zone 6, although protection from too much winter moisture will help prevent rot.  

  • Culver's-root

    Veronicastrum virginicum

    Native to eastern and central North America, Veronicastrum virginicum is a tall perennial which grows in low meadows, prairies, moist open forests, thickets and along roadsides. Its small white flowers are arranged in a spike up to 8 inches long and will bloom from June through to September. Bees and butterflies are attracted to the plant's pollen and nectar.

  • Large, pink and white swirl flower with bright red center.

    Rose Mallow

    Hibiscus ′Starry Starry Night′

    ‘Starry Starry Night’ is a hardy, rose mallow hybrid with large flowers up to 8 inches across that blooms from July to September.  These flowers, which attract hummingbirds, are a stand out against the plant’s dark purple foliage.  This rose mallow grows to 3 feet tall and 4 feet wide and performs best in moist soils and full sun. You may associate hibiscus with tropical plants, but within the parentage of ‘Starry Starry Night’ are species of hibiscus native the eastern United States.

  • Ornamental Carrot

    Daucus carota ′Dara′

    You may be familiar with the common roadside wildflower Queen Anne's lace, also known as wild carrot, with a flat-topped cluster of white flowers, reminiscent of lace. This ornamental selection, 'Dara', produces flowers from light pink to purple-red. Along with its fine textured foliage, which adds a slight airy feel to summer planting beds and borders, ornamental carrot can be used as a cut flower and later in dried arrangements.

  • Purple inflorescence of flowers

    Perennial Phlox

    Phlox paniculata 'Robert Poore'
  • Pink petaled flower with orange center.

    Chinese Anemone

    Anemone tomentosa 'Robustissima'
  • Deam's Coneflower

    Rudbeckia fulgida var. deamii
  • Yellow petaled flower with stamen.

    Daylily

    Hemerocallis 'Statuesque'
  • Bright orange flower with blending of lighter orange in the center.

    Informal Decorative Dahlia

    Dahlia 'Neon Splendor'
  • Orchid

    Habenaria rhodocheila
  • Cardinal-flower

    Lobelia cardinalis
  • Inflorescence of purple flowers

    Angelonia

    Angelonia 'Ansublu' Angelface Super Blue (Angelface Group)
  • Small, purple flowers with many thin peddles

    Stokes-aster

    Stokesia laevis 'Peachie’s Pick'
  • Bengal-clockvine

    Thunbergia grandiflora
  • Spiracle heads of small light purple flowers.
  • Tall, stems with purple, layered flowers along the top

    Lemon Bee-balm

    Monarda citriodora
  • Meadow-rue

    Thalictrum rochebrunianum ′Lavender Mist′
  • Samoan-gardenia

    Tabernaemontana africana


     

  • Six pointed white peddles surrounding a red and yellow centered flower

    Fragrant Gladiolus

    Gladiolus murielae
  • White flower with layered thin, curved petals

    Shrub Rose

    Rosa 'KORblixmu' Polar Express™
  • Tall, green stems with medium sized yellow flowers

    Cup-plant

    Silphium perfoliatum

    The Meadow Garden is filled with plants that benefit wildlife.  Cup-plant is a native perennial that grows to 8 feet tall.  Its perfoliate leaves, which clasp around the stem forming a cup, collect water for birds and insects.  Cup-plant provides nectar and pollen for a variety of bees, while birds, especially goldfinches, eat its seeds.